Drum Player in Bruges

Discussions on various technical aspects of carillon instruments and standards.

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Drum Player in Bruges

Postby JohnGouwens on Tue Jan 29, 2013 4:43 pm

It's interesting to hear the enormous Drum player of the Bruges carillon in action. I've often quipped that these historic drums (and some not-so-historic drums) often sound like a young child trying to play the piano (jerky rhythm, not all notes in a chord sounding together). Still, shouldn't a just-renovated drum system sound better than this?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AL-vArCF5Ck
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8VJ9D1bdr_o
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETG2FxNFss8
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Re: Drum Player in Bruges

Postby JohnGouwens on Tue Jan 29, 2013 4:48 pm

Here are a couple of links with other antique playing drums, showing it can be done better:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PtR9SbtKbAo
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Y101Q0yE1I
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Re: Drum Player in Bruges

Postby Gideon Bodden on Wed Jan 30, 2013 6:30 pm

When a Flemish bell-company lays its hands on the largest, most sophisticated and most famous carillon playing mechanism in the Low Countries, but apparently doesn't even make the effort of getting aquainted with the basic laws of mechanics, then we have arrived back in the dark period of the carillon culture. That the city authorities don't have these sounds of drunkards halted immediately, says it all. In this way, the carillon art in Bruges is being displayed as a joke, it is a grotesque discordance.
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Re: Drum Player in Bruges

Postby JohnGouwens on Thu Jan 31, 2013 5:00 am

Frank Deleu has responded up on Facebook about this. I'm curious, though, what makes the Bruges drum so special. I get the impression it's actually the largest one, at least in the Low Countries. Am I right? Is it also a spring drum? (To all - a "spring drum" is one of those enormous drums that, like a cylinder music box, shifts to one side to align a second set of pins, so that two full revolutions of the drum may be programmed. But those are beastly to re-pin!!) :shock:
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Re: Drum Player in Bruges

Postby Gideon Bodden on Thu Jan 31, 2013 9:23 pm

What is so special about the drum mechanism of the Bruges carillon? Its formidable size, refinement, it has been designed and constructed as a piece of art (by Jan de Hont, citizen of Hilvarenbeek). There's no question it has worked brilliantly in its early days. Imagine that, every 7.5 minutes day and night, great pieces of carillon music, performed fully automatically by such an amazing machine, it must have been considered a miracle. Today it performs miraculously bad, thanks to a bunch of amateurs!
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Re: Drum Player in Bruges

Postby JohnGouwens on Thu Jan 31, 2013 10:09 pm

You know, many of the GCNA contingent have never seen it. (I have only seen very old photographs of it.) It would be nice to post some pictures of it here. You can put those right in the text by inserting the URL to a web location of a photo. (Use the Img button above.) Antwerp also goes off every 7.5 minutes, of course. That's not as large a drum, correct?

Here's one link
Image

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dpc47/2497082661/?q=bruges%20carillon%20drum

Image
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